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Isabelle Plante, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier

531, boulevard des Prairies

Laval (Québec)

H7V 1B7

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Telephone : 450-687-5010 x8814

Fax: 450-686-5592

 

Field of research:

My research aims to determine the role of cellular interactions during mammary gland development and in breast cancer. More especially, we want to understand the regulation and the function of gap, adherens and tight junctions during mammary gland development, and how their dysregulation, by mutations or environmental pollutants, influence breast cancer progression.

Identify the role of cell-cell junctions during mammary gland development.

The breast is formed by two compartments: the stroma, mainly composed of adipocytes, fibroblasts and extracellular matrices, and the epithelium, formed by an internal layer of luminal cells surrounded by basal cells, mainly composed of myoepithelial cells. It has been demonstrated that interactions within and between the two layers of cells is crucial for proper development and function of the gland. Moreover, interactions between the epithelium and the surrounding stroma are also necessary. Therefore, this project focuses on the role and the regulation of junctional protein during the different stages of mammary gland development.

To define the role of intercellular junctions in breast cancer.

Although dysregulation of junctional proteins have been linked to breast cancer for years, mechanisms involved are poorly known. Moreover, an increasing number of evidences demonstrates that the microenvironment surrounding the tumors play in important role in cancer progression. This project thus aims to determine how junctional proteins relate to breast cancer progression, and how the surrounding microenvironment influence their expression.

To establish whether environmental pollutants influence mammary gland development and promote breast cancer

In many countries, breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women. While the causes are pleomorphic and generally unknown, it is generally admitted that 70-90% of all cancers are linked to behavioral, dietary and environmental factors. While the term environment applies to many factors, our research focuses on chemicals present in air, water, food and personal care and household products. More precisely, our concerns relate to exposure to endocrine disruptors such as phthalates. Endocrine disruptors are defined as substances which modulate the actions of hormones in the body, thus interfering with the normal development and function of the tissues. Since mammary gland development and function are tightly orchestrated by hormones, slights changes in their levels or actions can modify cell proliferation and differentiation, and thus promote breast cancer.

 

Resume of recent results:

Using a mouse model harboring a mutation within the Connexin 43 (Cx43) gene, a gap junction protein, we showed that the mutation leads to decreased levels of Cx43 in the mammary gland, uterus and ovaries. These decreases result in lower numbers of mature oocytes, in utero deaths, improper contractions of the uterus, delayed mammary gland development and defects in milk ejection (Plante et al., 2010; Tong et al., 2009; Tong et al., 2009; Plante and Laird, 2008). Moreover, when the G60S mice were exposed to a carcinogen and/or crossed with mice over-expressing ErbB2, a well-known breast oncogene, we observed a delay in the onset of palpable tumors, extensive mammary gland hyperplasia and increased mammary gland metastases to the lung (Plante et al., 2011). This study was the first to associate a decrease in Cx43 levels with increased metastasis. 

 

Laboratory members:

Name

Position

Email Address

Mélanie Busby PhD Student

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Elham Dianati

PhD Student

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Anne Weber-Ouellette MSc Student This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Sara Benkirane MSc Student This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Alexandre Petit MSc Student This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Rita Gouesse PhD Student This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Bélinda Crobeddu PhD Student This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Lists of publications:

Book chapters

  • Cyr DG, Devine PJ and Plante I. 2016. Immunhistochemistry and female reproductive toxicology: The ovary and mammary glands. In “Technical Aspects of Toxicological Immunohistochemistry; System Specific Biomarkers” S. Aziz ed. Springer, New York
  • Plaa GL, Charbonneau M and Plante I. 2014. Detection and Evaluation of Chemically Induced Liver Injury. In “Principles and Methods in Toxicology, Sixth Edition”. AW Hayes ed., Ann Harbor, MI (2014)

Per-reviewed papers

  • Elham Dianati, Jérémy Poiraud, Anne Weber-Ouellette and Isabelle Plante, Connexins, E-cadherin, Claudin-7 and β-catenin transiently form junctional nexuses during the post-natal mammary gland development. Dev Biol. 2016 Aug 1;416(1):52-68. doi: 10.1016/j.ydbio.2016.06.011. Epub 2016 Jun 9.
  • Micheal K. Stewart, Isabelle Plante, Silvia Penuela and Dale W. Laird, Loss of Panx1 Impairs Mammary Gland Development at Lactation: Implications for Breast Tumorigenesis. PLoS One. 2016 Apr 21;11(4):e0154162. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0154162. eCollection 2016.
  • Arianne Delisle, Emanuelle Ferraris and Isabelle Plante, Chronic exposure to hexachlorobenzene results in down-regulation of connexin43 in the breast. Environ Res. 2015 Nov;143(Pt A):229-40. doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2015.10.020. Epub 2015 Oct 28.
  • Michael K Stewart, Isabelle Plante, John F Bechberger, Christian C Naus and Dale W Laird. Mammary gland specific knockdown of the physiological surge in Cx26 during pregnancy retains normal mammary gland development and function. PLOS ONE. 2014, Jul 2;9(7):e101546
  • Isabelle Plante, Michael K.G. Stewart and Dale W. Laird. Evaluation of Mammary Gland Development and Function in Mouse Models. Journal of Visualized Experiments. 2011, Jul 21;(53). pii: 2828. doi: 10.3791/2828
  • Isabelle Plante, Michael K.G. Stewart, Alisson L. Allan and Dale W. Laird. Cx43 suppresses mammary tumor metastasis to the lung in a Cx43 mutant mouse model of human disease. Oncogene. 2011, 30:1681–1692.
  • Isabelle Plante, Andrea Wallis, Qing Shao and Dale W. Laird. Milk Secretion and Ejection Are Impaired in the Mammary Gland of Mice Harboring a Cx43 Mutant While Expression and Localization of Tight and Adherens Junction Proteins Remain Unchanged. Biology of Reproduction. 2010 May;82(5):837-47
  • Dan Tong, Xuerong Lv, Hong-Xing Wang, Isabelle Plante, Dale W. Laird, Donglin Bai and Gerald M. Kidder. A dominant loss-of-function Cx43 mutant impairs parturition in the mouse. Biology of Reproduction. 2009 Jun;80(6):1099-106.
  • Dan Tong, Deanne Colley, Renee Thoo, Isabelle Plante, Dale W. Laird, Donglin Bai and Gerald M. Kidder. Oogenesis defects in a mutant mouse model of oculodentodigital dysplasia. Disease Models and Mechanisms. 2009 Mar-Apr;2(3-4):157-67.
  • Janet L. Manias, Isabelle Plante, Xiang-Qun Gong, Qing Shao, Jared Churko, Donglin Bai and Dale W.Laird. Fate of connexin43 in cardiac tissue harbouring a disease-linked connexin43 mutant. Cardiovascular Research. 2008, Dec 1;80(3):385-95.
  • Isabelle Plante and Dale W. Laird. Decreased Levels of Connexin43 Result in Impaired Development of the Mammary Gland in a Mouse Model of Oculodentodigital Dysplasia. Developmental Biology. 2008, Jun; 318(2):312-22.
  • Elizabeth McLachlan, Isabelle Plante, Qing Shao, Dan Tong, Gerald M. Kidder, Suzanne M. Bernier, and Dale W. Laird. ODDD-linked Cx43 mutants reduce endogenous Cx43 expression and function in osteoblasts and inhibit late stage differentiation. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, 2008, Jun; 23(6):928-38.
  • Isabelle Plante, Daniel G.Cyr and Michel Charbonneau. Sexual dimorphism in the regulation of liver connexin32 transcription in hexachlorobenzene-treated rats. Toxicological Sciences, 2007, Mar; 96(1):47-57.
  • Isabelle Plante, Michel Charbonneau and Daniel G.Cyr, Régulation des interactions cellule-cellule dans l’hépatocancérogenèse induite par l’hexachlorobenzène chez le rat, Bulletin de la Société Zoologique de France. 2007, 132(1-2) :23-30.
  • Isabelle Plante, Michel Charbonneau and Daniel G. Cyr. Activation of the integrin-linked kinase pathway downregulates hepatic connexin32 via nuclear Akt, Carcinogenesis. 2006, Sep;27(9):1923-9.
  • Isabelle Plante, Daniel G.Cyr and Michel Charbonneau. Involvement of the integrin-linked kinase pathway in hexachlorobenzene-induced gender-specific rat hepatocarcinogenesis, Toxicological Sciences. 2005, Dec;88(2):346-57.
  • Isabelle Plante, Michel Charbonneau and Daniel G. Cyr. Decreased Gap Junctionnal Intercellular Communication In Hexachlorobenzene-Induced Gender-Specific Hepatic Tumor Formation In The Rat, Carcinogenesis. 2002, Jul; 23(7):1243-9.
  • Nadeau D, Corneau S, Plante I, Morrow G and Tanguay RM.   Evaluation for Hsp70 as a biomarker of effect of pollutants on the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris, Cell Stress Chaperones. 2001, Apr; 6(2):153-63.

Award:

  • FRQS Junior 1 career award, 2015-2020
  • Best poster presentation, 15th Murray Barr Research Day, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, The University of Western Ontario, October 30 2008, London, ON
  • Poster presentation award, Reasons for Hope 2008 Scientific Conference, Canadian Breast Cancer Research Alliance, April 24-27 2008, Vancouver, CB
  • Best poster presentation, The Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry
    CIHR-STP & the Department of Oncology. Oncology Research and Education Day 4th Annual Meeting, June 22 2007, London, ON
  • Third place, Best poster presentation, Molecular Biology Specialty Section, Society of Toxicology 44th Annual Meeting, March 6-10 2005, Nouvelle Orleans, LA
  • Honorable mention, Best poster presentation, Carcinogenesis Specialty Section, Society of Toxicology 44th Annual Meeting, March 6-10 2005, Nouvelle Orleans, LA
  • Finalist Hans Selye award, Club de Recherches Cliniques du Québec, 46ième réunion annuelle, September 23-24 2004, Beaupré, QC
  • Third place, Best poster presentation, Carcinogenesis Specialty Section, Society of Toxicology 42th Annual Meeting, March 9-13 2003, Salt Lake City, UA
  • Cantox Award for Best poster presentation, Society of Toxicology of Canada 35th Annual Meeting, December 5-6 2002, Montréal, QC
  • Honorable mention, Cantox Award for Best poster presentation, Society of Toxicology of Canada 34th Annual Meeting, December 26-2 2001, Montréal, QC
  • Best poster presentation, Canadian Network of Toxicology Centres Research Symposium, March 27-28 2000, Ottawa, ON