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    tremblay    

Jacques J. Tremblay, Ph.D. , LL.B.

Professor

Centre de recherche en reproduction, développement et santé intergénérationnelle

Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec - Université Laval

Département d'Obstétrique, gynécologie et reproduction

Reproduction, santé de la mère et de l'enfant

2705, boul. Laurier, Québec (Québec)

G1V 4G2

Phone: 418 525-4444, poste 46254

Fax: 418 654-2783

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Research Interests:

  • Hormonal action
  • Cell Culture
  • Development
  • Cellular differentiation
  • Male sexual differentiation
  • Genetic expression
  • Transcription factors
  • Protein-DNA and Protein-protein interactions
  • Endcocrine perturbators
  • Steroidogenesis
  • Transcription
  • Transfection 
  • Intracellular signalling
  • Gene editing
  • Transgenic mice
  • Proteomics
  • Transcriptomics

 

Summary of Results: 

My research program is at the crossroad of endocrinology and cellular and molecular biology. We study the molecular mechanisms regulating the differentiation and function of Leydig cells, the cells responsible for producing the steroid hormone testosterone. Inadequate levels of steroid hormones are the cause, or at least an aggravating factor, of several human pathologies including various cancers, PCOS, endometriosis, autoimmune diseases and inflammation. Understanding how this system works normally, by studying Leydig cells, will provide essential information that will ultimately lead to better diagnosis and treatment of these problems.

Although different hormones and signalling molecules have been implicated in the differentiation and function of Leydig cells, transcription factors downstream of these pathways remain unknown. So far, we have identified several transcription factors, some of which had never been reported in Leydig cells and are well-known critical regulators of cell differentiation in other tissues. Some are present exclusively in the male gonad, others in the adult population of Leydig cells, and others represent markers of Leydig stem cells. In addition, we have demonstrated the presence of CAMKI kinase in Leydig and its involvement in gene expression following a hormonal stimulus. Finally, we identified the AMPK kinase as the first molecular brake of steroidogenesis, which has many clinical implications. The targets of these two kinases remain to be identified. Our work on the characterization of the roles of these transcription factors and kinases involves classical molecular and cellular biology technologies, gene editing, animal models, as well as proteomics, genomics and bioinformatics approaches.

 

Lab Members: 

Name

Position

Email Address

Gabriel Garon

Ph.D. student

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Catherine Brousseau

Research Professionnal

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Nicholas Robert

Research Professionnal

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Samir Mehanovic Ph.D. student This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Zoheir Demmouche Ph.D. student This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Oona Delmas Ph.D. student This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Saliha Addour Undergratuate trainee This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Publications:
PubMed link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=search&term=Tremblay%20JJ  

Awards:

2013 recipient of the Matthew P. Hardy Young Andrologist Award de la American Society of Andrology