logotype
LHermo

Louis Hermo

Professor

McGill University

Department : Anatomy and Cell Biology

3640 University Street

Montreal, Qc

H3A 2B2

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Telephone: 514-398-6348

Fax: 514-398-5047


Field of research: 

Male Reproduction


Resume of results:

At the time of sperm release from the seminiferous epithelium of the rat testis, sperm retains a small bulge of cytoplasm at the neck region of their flagella. This structure is referred to as the cytoplasmic droplet (CD). This droplet is maintained by sperm as they travel through the epidydimis. We have recently characterized by quantitative proteomics 1511 proteins in the cytoplasmic droplet of the epidydimal sperm. In addition to proteins that are well characterized such as cytoskeletal proteins, we also observed proteins of the ER and Golgi apparatus in the cytoplasmic droplet. We are presently trying to determine the role of these proteins in relation to sperm motility and sperm maturation.

In addition to isolating the CD of epidydimal sperm a method was devised to isolate the Golgi apparatus of testicular cells. The most abundant protein by proteomics in this testis-Golgi fraction was noted to be GL54D, of poorly understood function. Antibodies were raised to six different peptides sequences of GL54D. By use of light microscope immuno-histochemistry this protein was revealed to be exclusively in the Golgi apparatus of germ cells of the testis. GL54D, because of its high abundance (it is the most abundant protein of germ cell Golgi apparatus) and specificity (it is only expressed in germ cells of the testis) is predicted to function exclusively in the regulation of fertilization. Since this is the first time GL54D has been characterized as a protein then it may be the target for controlling fertilization in the human male. Due to the high abundance of this protein in germ cells, we want to determine a functional significance of this protein as related to the development of germ cells in the testis. Therefore, one of our major current objectives is to determine the function of GL54D.

 

Laboratory members:

Name

Position

Email Address

Paul Simon

Master Student

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Elliot Byrne

Master Student

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Aurore Fonderflick

Undergraduate Student

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dru Perkins

Undergraduate Student

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


List of publications:

150 publications available on PubMed when searching for Hermo L. of which the twenty five most recents are: 

  1. ABCA17 mediates sterol efflux from mouse spermatozoa plasma membranes. Morales CR, Ni X, Smith CE, Inagaki N, Hermo L.
  2. Male reproductive system defects and subfertility in a mutant mouse model of oculodentodigital dysplasia. Gregory M, Kahiri CN, Barr KJ, Smith CE, Hermo L, Cyr DG, Kidder GM.
  3. Arylsulfatase A deficiency causes seminolipid accumulation and a lysosomal storage disorder in Sertoli cells. Xu H, Kongmanas K, Kadunganattil S, Smith CE, Rupar T, Goto-Inoue N, Hermo L, Faull KF, Tanphaichitr N.
  4. Mice lacking the USP2 deubiquitinating enzyme have severe male subfertility associated with defects in fertilization and sperm motility. Bedard N, Yang Y, Gregory M, Cyr DG, Suzuki J, Yu X, Chian RC, Hermo L, O'Flaherty C, Smith CE, Clarke HJ, Wing SS.
  5. Thirsty business: cell, region, and membrane specificity of aquaporins in the testis, efferent ducts, and epididymis and factors regulating their expression. Hermo L, Smith CE.
  6. Characterization of pannexin1 and pannexin3 and their regulation by androgens in the male reproductive tract of the adult rat. Turmel P, Dufresne J, Hermo L, Smith CE, Penuela S, Laird DW, Cyr DG.
  7. Endocrine regulation of male fertility by the skeleton. Oury F, Sumara G, Sumara O, Ferron M, Chang H, Smith CE, Hermo L, Suarez S, Roth BL, Ducy P, Karsenty G.
  8. Alterations in the testis and epididymis associated with loss of function of the cystatin-related epididymal spermatogenic (CRES) protein. Parent AD, Cornwall GA, Liu LY, Smith CE, Hermo L.
  9. Normoxic expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 in rat Leydig cells in vivo and in vitro. Palladino MA, Pirlamarla PR, McNamara J, Sottas CM, Korah N, Hardy MP, Hales DB, Hermo L.
  10. Alterations in the human blood-epididymis barrier in obstructive azoospermia and the development of novel epididymal cell lines from infertile men. Dube E, Hermo L, Chan PT, Cyr DG.
  11. Assessing the role of claudins in maintaining the integrity of epididymal tight junctions using novel human epididymal cell lines. Dubé E, Dufresne J, Chan PT, Hermo L, Cyr DG.
  12. Surfing the wave, cycle, life history, and genes/proteins expressed by testicular germ cells. Part 1: background to spermatogenesis, spermatogonia, and spermatocytes. Hermo L, Pelletier RM, Cyr DG, Smith CE.
  13. Surfing the wave, cycle, life history, and genes/proteins expressed by testicular germ cells. Part 2: changes in spermatid organelles associated with development of spermatozoa. Hermo L, Pelletier RM, Cyr DG, Smith CE.
  14. Surfing the wave, cycle, life history, and genes/proteins expressed by testicular germ cells. Part 5: intercellular junctions and contacts between germs cells and Sertoli cells and their regulatory interactions, testicular cholesterol, and genes/proteins associated with more than one germ cell generation. Hermo L, Pelletier RM, Cyr DG, Smith CE.
  15. Surfing the wave, cycle, life history, and genes/proteins expressed by testicular germ cells. Part 4: intercellular bridges, mitochondria, nuclear envelope, apoptosis, ubiquitination, membrane/voltage-gated channels, methylation/acetylation, and transcription factors. Hermo L, Pelletier RM, Cyr DG, Smith CE.
  16. Surfing the wave, cycle, life history, and genes/proteins expressed by testicular germ cells. Part 3: developmental changes in spermatid flagellum and cytoplasmic droplet and interaction of sperm with the zona pellucida and egg plasma membrane. Hermo L, Pelletier RM, Cyr DG, Smith CE.
  17. Dysregulation of WNT/CTNNB1 and PI3K/AKT signaling in testicular stromal cells causes granulosa cell tumor of the testis. Boyer A, Paquet M, Laguë MN, Hermo L, Boerboom D.
  18. Membrane domain specificity in the spatial distribution of aquaporins 5, 7, 9, and 11 in efferent ducts and epididymis of rats. Hermo L, Schellenberg M, Liu LY, Dayanandan B, Zhang T, Mandato CA, Smith CE.
  19. Seminiferous tubule degeneration and infertility in mice with sustained activation of WNT/CTNNB1 signaling in sertoli cells. Boyer A, Hermo L, Paquet M, Robaire B, Boerboom D.
  20. Alterations in gene expression in the caput epididymides of nonobstructive azoospermic men. Dubé E, Hermo L, Chan PT, Cyr DG.
  21. Alterations in the testis of hormone sensitive lipase-deficient mice is associated with decreased sperm counts, sperm motility, and fertility. Hermo L, Chung S, Gregory M, Smith CE, Wang SP, El-Alfy M, Cyr DG, Mitchell GA, Trasler J.
  22. Regulated expression of the ubiquitin protein ligase, E3(Histone)/LASU1/Mule/ARF-BP1/HUWE1, during spermatogenesis. Liu Z, Miao D, Xia Q, Hermo L, Wing SS.
  23. Orchestration of occludins, claudins, catenins and cadherins as players involved in maintenance of the blood-epididymal barrier in animals and humans. Cyr DG, Gregory M, Dubé E, Dufresne J, Chan PT, Hermo L.
  24. Structural alterations of epididymal epithelial cells in cathepsin A-deficient mice affect the blood-epididymal barrier and lead to altered sperm motility. Hermo L, Korah N, Gregory M, Liu LY, Cyr DG, D'Azzo A, Smith CE.
  25. Microvillar size and espin expression in principal cells of the adult rat epididymis are regulated by androgens. Primiani N, Gregory M, Dufresne J, Smith CE, Liu YL, Bartles JR, Cyr DG, Hermo L.