Vilceu Bordignon, PhD

Associate professor, McGill University

research axis 3

Address

  • 514 398-7793
  • vilceu.bordignon@mcgill.ca
  • Department of Animal Science, McGill University
    21111, rue Lakeshore
    Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC
    H9X 3V9

Research interests

  • Oocyte and embryo development
  • cell reprogramming
  • genome editing

Embryo development:

Normal development depends upon the integrity and homeostasis of the few cells, present at the beginning of embryonic life. Embryonic mortality is an important element affecting fertility and production in domestic animal species. Our lab is using porcine and bovine embryos produced in vitro by different protocols (e.g., fertilization, intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection, nuclear transfer, parthenogenetic activation), to investigate how early stage embryos deal with stressful conditions (e.g., genome damage and endoplasmic reticulum stress) by regulating coping mechanisms that allow them to survive and develop.

Cell reprogramming:

Cell differentiation and reprogramming hold great promise for understanding disease mechanisms and developing cell-based therapies.  Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) into enucleated oocytes was the original method used to confirm that differentiated somatic cells can be completely reprogrammed through a second round of development. We are performing SCNT to investigate cellular and epigenetic reprogramming in porcine and bovine embryos.

Genome editing and creation of pig models for research:

Swine are an ideal animal model for biomedical research since they adequately represent features of human physiology, anatomy, metabolic profile and pathophysiology responses. Consequently, there has been an exponential increase in the use of pigs – particularly miniature pigs – in the study of the underlying mechanisms of human diseases. Our lab is using genome editing tools (CRISPR/Cas system) along with SCNT and in vitro embryo production to create gene-edited pigs that can be used to study development, metabolism and pathophysiology mechanisms.

Members of the laboratory

Vanessa Guay, BSc
MSc student
vanessa.guay2@mail.mcgill.ca

Luke Currin, MSc
PhD student
luke.currin@mail.mcgill.ca

Marc Maserati, MSc
PhD student
marc.maserati@gmail.com

Mariana Priotto de Macedo, MSc
PhD student
mpriottodemacedo@gmail.com

Zigomar da Silva, MSc
Visiting student (PhD)
zigomar.vet@gmail.com

Naomi Dicks, PhD
Postdoc
naomi.dicks@mail.mcgill.ca

Karina Gutierrez, PhD
Postdoc
karina.gutierrez@mail.mcgill.ca

Werner Giel Glanzner, PhD
Postdoc
wernergiehl@gmail.com

Hernan Baldassarre
Research associate
hernan.baldassarre@mcgill.ca

Publications